laireshi:

Tony walked in the living room. He held himself very straight and his face was a carefully emotionless mask, but Steve could see he was fuming.

"What happened?" Steve asked.

Tony stopped, turned to look at him and took in a steadying breath. “I told you someone wanted to make an Avengers movie.”

He had. It was weird, to think of people wanting to make their lives into entertainment — but the cartoon, Earth’s Mightiest Heroes, was harmless enough, and Tony made sure that the majority of income from all such projects went to charity, so Steve thought it was all right.

"Yeah?"

Bruce, sitting in the corner, raised his head. “Another one?”

"Why, it is only normal people want to hear stories of the adventures," Thor said.

Tony looked at Bruce and something flickered on his face. Steve raised his eyebrows. “Tony?”

"I broke the negotiations," he said, very calmly.

It happened. It didn’t explain how furious he was. Steve wanted to ask, but then Tony continued, “They wanted to make it without Jan.”

There was a moment of silence, and then Steve punched the coffee table so hard it broke, a thunderstorm started outside out of nowhere and the Hulk broke loose.

There was no Avengers without Jan.

Where’s that post about “we are not influenced by the MCU when we take decisions for marvel NOW” when you need it 

like

srsly

fuck you marvel

laireshi:

Summary:

Steve woke up with the absolute certainty he was missing something.

read on AO3

nohaijiachi, don’t be sad, have sad Steve ;)

Thanks to missbeckywrites for betaing!

italiansreclaimingitaly:

Remember our initiative “Vacanze Italiane”?
Since I’ll be spending mine in Rome, I thought it’d be nice to talk about one of the most peculiar and unique trademarks of the city: the nasone fountains.
The name “nasone” literally means big nose, as the faucet suggests. The nasoni are public fountains that distribute drinkable water all over the city. The first fountains were designed in circa 1874, only a few years after the Unification, thanks to the interest of the first mayor of Rome, Luigi Pinciani. Their shape was much different back then, with a dragon head as decoration and three faucets instead of one, but they were still made of cast iron, as they are today.
The design quickly evolved into the one we see today. You can find the oldest nasone still in use with the “standard” shape in piazza della Rotonda (near the Pantheon) and a modern imitation of the first three-headed design in via delle Tre Cannelle, whose name is a reference to the fountain itself.
In 1980, to reduce the waste of water, the Comune decided to apply switches and buttons to regulate the water manually, but due to the questionable aesthetics and the frequent acts of vandalism, the project was soon abandoned. You can still find some of these nasoni, though. And if you want my personal opinion on them, the real problem is that the switch is either broken or a friggin’ pain in the butt to operate.
There are about 2500 nasoni in all of Rome and 280 inside the walls. In 2009 Acea, an Italian public utility that deals in energy and water, published a map of all the nasoni in the downtown area for citizens and tourists (I always carry one with me) with the motto: “Water is a treasure and Acea gives you the map”. You can find more about the history of the nasoni and the characteristics of the water in this ITA/ENG pdf, print your personal copy of the map* or download the app from iTunes.
*The map shows the locations of the nasoni, but doesn’t include the other, differently-shaped artistic fountains in the historical centre, even though they still provide drinkable water, like the the Barcaccia in Piazza di Spagna and the fountain set into the wall in via della Fontanella Borghese.
Sources: (x), (x), (x), (x)


EHI laireshi LOOK! AND YOU WOULDN’T BELIEVE ME ABOUT THE WATER BEING DRINKABLE U TROLL italiansreclaimingitaly:

Remember our initiative “Vacanze Italiane”?
Since I’ll be spending mine in Rome, I thought it’d be nice to talk about one of the most peculiar and unique trademarks of the city: the nasone fountains.
The name “nasone” literally means big nose, as the faucet suggests. The nasoni are public fountains that distribute drinkable water all over the city. The first fountains were designed in circa 1874, only a few years after the Unification, thanks to the interest of the first mayor of Rome, Luigi Pinciani. Their shape was much different back then, with a dragon head as decoration and three faucets instead of one, but they were still made of cast iron, as they are today.
The design quickly evolved into the one we see today. You can find the oldest nasone still in use with the “standard” shape in piazza della Rotonda (near the Pantheon) and a modern imitation of the first three-headed design in via delle Tre Cannelle, whose name is a reference to the fountain itself.
In 1980, to reduce the waste of water, the Comune decided to apply switches and buttons to regulate the water manually, but due to the questionable aesthetics and the frequent acts of vandalism, the project was soon abandoned. You can still find some of these nasoni, though. And if you want my personal opinion on them, the real problem is that the switch is either broken or a friggin’ pain in the butt to operate.
There are about 2500 nasoni in all of Rome and 280 inside the walls. In 2009 Acea, an Italian public utility that deals in energy and water, published a map of all the nasoni in the downtown area for citizens and tourists (I always carry one with me) with the motto: “Water is a treasure and Acea gives you the map”. You can find more about the history of the nasoni and the characteristics of the water in this ITA/ENG pdf, print your personal copy of the map* or download the app from iTunes.
*The map shows the locations of the nasoni, but doesn’t include the other, differently-shaped artistic fountains in the historical centre, even though they still provide drinkable water, like the the Barcaccia in Piazza di Spagna and the fountain set into the wall in via della Fontanella Borghese.
Sources: (x), (x), (x), (x)


EHI laireshi LOOK! AND YOU WOULDN’T BELIEVE ME ABOUT THE WATER BEING DRINKABLE U TROLL italiansreclaimingitaly:

Remember our initiative “Vacanze Italiane”?
Since I’ll be spending mine in Rome, I thought it’d be nice to talk about one of the most peculiar and unique trademarks of the city: the nasone fountains.
The name “nasone” literally means big nose, as the faucet suggests. The nasoni are public fountains that distribute drinkable water all over the city. The first fountains were designed in circa 1874, only a few years after the Unification, thanks to the interest of the first mayor of Rome, Luigi Pinciani. Their shape was much different back then, with a dragon head as decoration and three faucets instead of one, but they were still made of cast iron, as they are today.
The design quickly evolved into the one we see today. You can find the oldest nasone still in use with the “standard” shape in piazza della Rotonda (near the Pantheon) and a modern imitation of the first three-headed design in via delle Tre Cannelle, whose name is a reference to the fountain itself.
In 1980, to reduce the waste of water, the Comune decided to apply switches and buttons to regulate the water manually, but due to the questionable aesthetics and the frequent acts of vandalism, the project was soon abandoned. You can still find some of these nasoni, though. And if you want my personal opinion on them, the real problem is that the switch is either broken or a friggin’ pain in the butt to operate.
There are about 2500 nasoni in all of Rome and 280 inside the walls. In 2009 Acea, an Italian public utility that deals in energy and water, published a map of all the nasoni in the downtown area for citizens and tourists (I always carry one with me) with the motto: “Water is a treasure and Acea gives you the map”. You can find more about the history of the nasoni and the characteristics of the water in this ITA/ENG pdf, print your personal copy of the map* or download the app from iTunes.
*The map shows the locations of the nasoni, but doesn’t include the other, differently-shaped artistic fountains in the historical centre, even though they still provide drinkable water, like the the Barcaccia in Piazza di Spagna and the fountain set into the wall in via della Fontanella Borghese.
Sources: (x), (x), (x), (x)


EHI laireshi LOOK! AND YOU WOULDN’T BELIEVE ME ABOUT THE WATER BEING DRINKABLE U TROLL

italiansreclaimingitaly:

Remember our initiative “Vacanze Italiane”?

Since I’ll be spending mine in Rome, I thought it’d be nice to talk about one of the most peculiar and unique trademarks of the city: the nasone fountains.

The name “nasone” literally means big nose, as the faucet suggests. The nasoni are public fountains that distribute drinkable water all over the city. The first fountains were designed in circa 1874, only a few years after the Unification, thanks to the interest of the first mayor of Rome, Luigi Pinciani. Their shape was much different back then, with a dragon head as decoration and three faucets instead of one, but they were still made of cast iron, as they are today.

The design quickly evolved into the one we see today. You can find the oldest nasone still in use with the “standard” shape in piazza della Rotonda (near the Pantheon) and a modern imitation of the first three-headed design in via delle Tre Cannelle, whose name is a reference to the fountain itself.

In 1980, to reduce the waste of water, the Comune decided to apply switches and buttons to regulate the water manually, but due to the questionable aesthetics and the frequent acts of vandalism, the project was soon abandoned. You can still find some of these nasoni, though. And if you want my personal opinion on them, the real problem is that the switch is either broken or a friggin’ pain in the butt to operate.

There are about 2500 nasoni in all of Rome and 280 inside the walls. In 2009 Acea, an Italian public utility that deals in energy and water, published a map of all the nasoni in the downtown area for citizens and tourists (I always carry one with me) with the motto: “Water is a treasure and Acea gives you the map”. You can find more about the history of the nasoni and the characteristics of the water in this ITA/ENG pdf, print your personal copy of the map* or download the app from iTunes.

*The map shows the locations of the nasoni, but doesn’t include the other, differently-shaped artistic fountains in the historical centre, even though they still provide drinkable water, like the the Barcaccia in Piazza di Spagna and the fountain set into the wall in via della Fontanella Borghese.

Sources: (x), (x), (x), (x)

EHI laireshi LOOK! AND YOU WOULDN’T BELIEVE ME ABOUT THE WATER BEING DRINKABLE U TROLL

laireshi:

Me and nohaijiachi were on a walk when…

And of course we walked into that road to go take a picture with a life-size iron man statute in a shop. The irony XD

Me and laireshi got a 4 hours long trip (thanks to traffic jams) to reach a place we couldn’t visit because as soon as we were far enough from the car it started to rain so hard I couldn’t see what was in front of my face.
Now going home
Saaaaaad

laireshi:

nohaijiachi is a menace who hasn’t warned me there’d be Casualties of War in a tpb I picked up and then flashed The Confession panels at me.

so apparently laireshi it’s my secretary

I’m at Fiumicino waiting for laireshi and I’m not freaking out.

(I’m totally freaking out)

A day in this house, she already does this to climb on my desk for the only purpose of sleeping on my work